Installing Replacement Windows - Step-by-Step




People Who Liked This Video Also Liked

How to Install a Replacement Window - Pella Series 20 from Lowes Home Improvement
How to Install a Replacement Window - Pella Series 20 from Lowes Home Improvement
Windows 101 - Top 3 Mistakes Customers Make When Choosing A Window
Windows 101 - Top 3 Mistakes Customers Make When Choosing A Window
Home Depot American Craftsman by Andersen 70 Series Window Review Silverline 8501
Home Depot American Craftsman by Andersen 70 Series Window Review Silverline 8501
Infinity from Marvin vs. Pella - Replacement Window Comparison
Infinity from Marvin vs. Pella - Replacement Window Comparison
Energy Savr Window Inserts Review and How To
Energy Savr Window Inserts Review and How To

Did this video help you?

Daniel: She can provably cook as good as she can install a window.

George Lerma, Sr.: Awesome video.

Tri Sutrisno: The graphic.. It's like 1993 video documentation.. So retro feeling.. What camera do you use?

Well, I'll be changing my window soon.. Nice video there..

Scott Allen: I'm impressed, envious and maybe even a little jealous. You must have had a good dad that taught you some of this . Wow. Good for you.

Anthony Ng: Thank you for this informative video! :)

Michael Vaknin: Great Work and really appreciate your efforts. This kind of video is very helpful because I have also done my window replacement after watching www.youtube.com/watch?v=Brqx8BN4AXs

Tree Climber: I'm impressed. You did a better job explaining the process than many of the "old pros" in the industry.

yanni lorentzos: This girl is awesome I watch this video like twice and I still can't figure it out LOL

joswhitfie: Great job, are you single?

Luis Gonzales: Great video

dide quen: I need a wife like this.....

Zara Russell: I am in the process of replacing my originally installed aluminum single pane windows with Energy Star windows. Some of my windows are surrounded by brick as the window in the video is, while others are surrounded by Hardie Panel siding. In both cases since they were part of new construction they have nailing fins that are nailed onto the fronts of the wooden house framing behind the brick or siding. That makes the removal process somewhat more tedious. I am using an angle grinder with a 7 inch x 1/16 inch cutting disc to cut the nailing fins on all four sides and then removing the window. Then, although it's not really required I am using the same angle grinder/disc to cut the nails holding the nailing fins to the framing. I probably would not bother doing that except that the original windows were only secured with one nail on each side so removing the nailing fins was trivial.

I didn't see anything in the video where the author flashed the opening. That's a shame because it isn't terribly difficult or expensive. I used flashing tape which I installed from the bottom up so that each successive piece of tape is "outside" the one below it, thus always directing any water away from the inside of the house.

Then, because my new windows are thicker than the originals and thus must be set farther into the window openings in order for the screws to engage the HOUSE FRAMING, NOT THE BRICK I used a multi-tool (a generic term for an oscillating hand tool that you can buy at Home Depot, Lowe's or Harbor Freight) to cut the drywall and window sills back by the amount required to place the windows where I want them in the openings, again, to allow me to screw into the wooden house framing.

After the window is shimmed (very important to prevent window distortion) and installed in the flashed rough opening I caulked and then installed a drip edge over the tops of the windows. There are a number of videos on YouTube that show how to do it.

And finally, from what I have seen in other videos the front edge of the window should NOT be caulked. This is to give water a path to escape. In my particular case I installed the sill flashing tape by using a putty knife to force the tape down BETWEEN the siding (or brick as the case may be) and the house wrap, then continuing over the top of the lower wooden house framing and finally up and over the window sill. Then I trimmed the excess flashing tape so that it would not protrude up between the sill and the window. Next, I placed a pretty thick bead of sealant on the tape where the sill meets the framing. I placed the inner lower edge of the window into the sealant and pushed it back against the sill and installed the screws to secure the window. That way water and critters can't enter the house but any water that gets onto the flashing tape has a path to the outside. And it's easier to do than it is to describe.

Low expansion foam and caulk as the author described completes the installation.

That's how I'm doing it anyway...

Imunderpar4win: Big makeover at 11:08 - and the terminology used was quite arousing

Anguswoodbutcher: Excellent video. Really nice job and made in a way that doesn't turn it into rocket science. Well done.

Hinton Huff: Nice job, sliders are cheaper than single or double hung.

Ashraf Gujjar: My work almuinm 009668409107

Tim pierce: I like the Arizona WildCats shirt U of A baby

Kimberly Aker: Thank you for this video. You are the only one that answered my question and actually gave step by step.
Also, these comments are #WhyINeedFeminism.
Ya nasties.

duglas esquivel: Wow 😳 this is for stupid dum asses they didn't prepare before install it, just they left with foam, that's no safe, needed bichy think before install it

Eric Buckholt: Good job, remember level is for horizontally and plum is for vertically
Rating:
Installing Replacement Windows - Step-by-Step 5 out of 5

Featured Video

How to Insulate Walls


Installing Replacement Windows - Step-by-Step